a rose By any other name would smell as sweet – For stony limits cannot hold love out



O Romeo, Romeo! wherefore art thou Romeo?
Deny thy father and refuse thy name;
Or, if thou wilt not, be but sworn my love,
And I’ll no longer be a Capulet.



Aside Shall I hear more, or shall I speak at this?


‘Tis but thy name that is my enemy;
Thou art thyself, though not a Montague.
What’s Montague? it is nor hand, nor foot,
Nor arm, nor face, nor any other part
Belonging to a man. O, be some other name!
What’s in a name? that which we call a rose
By any other name would smell as sweet;
So Romeo would, were he not Romeo call’d,
Retain that dear perfection which he owes
Without that title. Romeo, doff thy name,
And for that name which is no part of thee
Take all myself.


I take thee at thy word:
Call me but love, and I’ll be new baptized;
Henceforth I never will be Romeo.


What man art thou that thus bescreen’d in night
So stumblest on my counsel?


By a name
I know not how to tell thee who I am:
My name, dear saint, is hateful to myself,
Because it is an enemy to thee;
Had I it written, I would tear the word.


My ears have not yet drunk a hundred words
Of that tongue’s utterance, yet I know the sound:
Art thou not Romeo and a Montague?


Neither, fair saint, if either thee dislike.


How camest thou hither, tell me, and wherefore?
The orchard walls are high and hard to climb,
And the place death, considering who thou art,
If any of my kinsmen find thee here.


With love’s light wings did I o’er-perch these walls;
For stony limits cannot hold love out,
And what love can do that dares love attempt;
Therefore thy kinsmen are no let to me.

Source: The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet – Wikisource, the free online library

A neuroscience researcher reveals 4 rituals that will make you a happier person – Business Insider

UCLA neuroscience researcher Alex Korb explains:

Everything is interconnected. Gratitude improves sleep. Sleep reduces pain. Reduced pain improves your mood. Improved mood reduces anxiety, which improves focus and planning. Focus and planning help with decision making. Decision making further reduces anxiety and improves enjoyment. Enjoyment gives you more to be grateful for, which keeps that loop of the upward spiral going. Enjoyment also makes it more likely you’ll exercise and be social, which, in turn, will make you happier.

Source: A neuroscience researcher reveals 4 rituals that will make you a happier person – Business Insider

Posted in Key

Pipes End-of-life Announcement


Jun 04 2015 – Pipes End-of-life Announcement

As of August 30th 2015, users will no longer be able to create new Pipes. The Pipes team will keep the infrastructure running until end of September 30th 2015 in a read-only mode.

You can download your Pipe definition by specifying your Pipe-ID (_id) and the output format (_out=json) to the following end-point: http://pipes.yahoo.com/pipes/pipe.info

For e.g:


Please post any questions you have related to this announcement on the Yahoo Developer Forum for Pipes. The Pipes team thanks you for support and cooperation.

via Yahoo Pipes Blog – Pipes End-of-life Announcement.


Answers for Society’s Most Uncomfortable Questions

5 Helpful Answers To Society’s Most Uncomfortable Questions | Cracked.com.

[parts saved here for posterity]

You’re not a person.

This is going to sound like some real Rust Cohle shit, but bear with me because deep down you already know all of this.

For instance, you already know that you are, to a certain degree, a product of your genes — they go a long way toward determining if you would be physically imposing or weak, smart or stupid, calm or anxious, energetic or lazy, and fat or thin. What your genes left undecided, your upbringing mostly took care of — how you were raised determined your values, your attitudes, and your religious beliefs. And what your genes and upbringing left undecided, your environment rounded into shape — what culture you were raised in, where you went to school, and who you were friends with growing up. If you had been born and raised in Saudi Arabia, you would be a different person today. If the Nazis had won World War II, you would be a different person, still.

So, even when personal choices finally come into play, you’re still choosing within that framework — you can choose between becoming a poet or a software engineer, but only because you were raised in a world in which other people had already invented both poetry and computers. That means every single little part of your life — every action, every choice, every thought, every emotion, every plan for the future, everything that you are and do and can potentially be — is the result ofthings other people did in the past.

These mostly dead people shaped every little molecule of you and the world you inhabit. You are the product of what they did, just as they were the product of those who came before them. You are, therefore, not a person any more than a leaf is a tree. It makes far more sense to think of yourself as one part of a whole (the “whole” being every human who has ever lived) than as an individual — you benefit from the whole’s successes, and you pay for its mistakes as if they were your own — whether you want to or not.

This is not abstract philosophy, this is not something you can choose to believe or not believe — this is a statement of physical fact. Refusing to acknowledge it will only leave you endlessly confused and frustrated. For instance, when you show up at a job interview, or a trial, or the set of a porno, that whole context will walk in the door with you. Everyone in that room will be making certain assumptions about you and will hold certain expectations, based on the greater whole of which you are a part.

That means you can’t think of your life as a story. You have to think of it as one sentence in a much longer story … a sentence that doesn’t make any sense out of context


McEvedy and Jones, Penguin Reference Books

That’s a world population graph dating back over the last 2,000 years. Just look at it! Around 200 years ago, a freaking switch got flipped, and shit exploded. There is no comparing humanity over the last couple of centuries with anything that came before. It’s like if you were driving home one day and saw that while you were gone, your goldfish had grown large enough to flatten the entire neighborhood.

But make no mistake: What you’re seeing on the graph is humanity winning. Winning so hard that we’re not even sure how to handle it. That up there is what every single species only wishes it could do. That kind of success requires utter mastery of the environment, food, health, and predators — humanity just absolutely dunking over all we survey.

You and I were born right in the middle of this unprecedented and unfathomable winning streak, during a series of changes that are whipping by at light speed, rendering what we think of as a “normal human life” utterly unrecognizable to someone living just 200 years ago. And change is terrifying. Lots of the old rules have gone out the window — they were written for a different time, with different problems in mind. Lots of the timeless advice you hear was spoken by people who never anticipated the world you’re living in. If you find all of the shit grown-ups say to you to be contradictory and confusing, that would be why.


The big flaw in humanity is that we always cling to short-term comfort over long-term prosperity (because we see ourselves as individuals, instead of part of a whole), and certain classes of people were benefiting from doing things the old way, even if humanity as a whole was not.


There is a difference between being “to blame” for something and being “responsible” for it. 

This is confusing because, as kids, we were taught that you clean up your own messes, and it’s easy to accidentally expand that to: “You only clean up your own messes.”

If they try to teach this in the classroom, critics will scream that they’re making white kids “feel guilty for being white.” But, there’s that confusion again — telling those kids they’re guilty (that is, “to blame”) for being white would be wrong. Telling those kids that, as white people, they areresponsible for fixing inequality is just a statement of fact. The entire concept of civilization is that things are supposed to always be getting better — each link in the chain is hopefully a little smarter, richer, and healthier than the one before….But, improving means fixing things that are broken. That is, things that other people broke.

Helping to rectify that situation is one of the many, many things you’re tasked with due to having been born in a fairly high place in the world. It’s not “fair,” but that’s a meaningless word when referencing things you have no control over. You didn’t ask to be born half-way up a mountain, but you were, and I need you to look down and realize that mountain is really a pile of bones.


In other words, why can’t we start treating each other like individuals based on our position in life, and just drop all of this race/gender stuff that just clouds the issue? Wouldn’t that be the fastest way to make things better for everyone?

Sure, and we could totally do that, if we were merely people. The problem is that we can’t just collectively agree to make the context of history go away, any more than a bunch of leaves can get together and decide that there is no tree; the roots of history are still feeding us.


Changing that doesn’t mean they’re winning, and you’re losing. This isn’t about you. There is no “you” at all, outside of this larger context. It’s about continuing this winning streak humanity has been on, and trying to build a world in which everybody — from the poor white dude in the trailer park to the black trans woman in Russia — has the best possible chance to make something with their lives. We can disagree about how exactly to do that, but as for those people talking about the “good old days” and getting back to “traditional” values? The best thing I can say about them is that they can’t possibly know what they’re asking for.

[David Wong]

A convoluted plethora of barely connected cloud silos

Recently on Facebook JP was lamenting the confused state of managing our data in the cloud when multiple identities and platforms are involved.

JP Rangaswami
New Windsor, United Kingdom ·
iCloud is terrible. Going back to Microsoft is unthinkable. Having lived through trying to use personal and corporate gmail accounts in parallel, Google is ruled out as well. Actually contemplating living a life without Apple or Google now, not just Microsoft. All three now excel at making simple things hard.


And it’s true. Trying to make sense out of the various cloud services is a convoluted mess.

I liked his post and in comments he asked me

JP Rangaswami David I’d be interested in knowing whether your experience of these services has deteriorated similarly. For me, as soon as you have multiple family accounts, multiple devices and want access to any sort of “content”, the user experience is Kafkaesque. Codified bureaucratic incompetence at Olympic levels.


There’s not an easy response to that. So as to not clog up Facebook comments I outline here what I’ve found the best solution – and by best I mean the one I currently use – none of this stuff is best… it’s all a kludge.

I need to use the following devices
A iMac and a Windows 7 PC at my desk at home
A Windows 7 laptop at my bed
A Windows 7 PC at my desk at work
An iPhone – on my desk when home; hanging around my neck on a lanyard when not.
All controlled by a stick held in my mouth – the iPhone, a stylus.

The biggest thing I use is email. Because I have to use 4 different computers at different times a stand alone email app is out and the browser email from google is in. For that I use Gmail – in the web browser on the computers and via the builtin app on iPhone.

I can’t use my iPhone very well when away from desk so most of what I do is at a keyboard and screen at a desk.

All my email accounts are fed into gmail and aliases setup so when replying to any email it appears as coming from the account to which it was sent. Mind you, this is only personal email.

Contacts are a pita and keeping the correct information synced and available across all devices is no fun. Google contacts I make the centre as I can always get to them from a browser. They are synced to my iMac via the contacts app but the app on Mac doesn’t sync to iCloud. Nor does the app on my iPhone. I make google contacts the centre repository and turn off iCloud syncing contacts. I know I can login to iCloud in my browser to get contacts but I’m forever on gmail so that makes more sense.

Calendars are the next big hurdle. Forgetting work for a while, just keeping my calendars in sync is done via my iMac. I turn on iCloud syncing on my iPhone for calendars to sync with my mac and then sync my Mac calendar also with google calendars.


For work, as I work for Government I can’t bridge the Govt. divide and so work email is via Outlook when at work or Outlook Web Access via a browser anywhere else (unless on the work vpn).

Same with calendars. I’m forever having to check clashes between my work and home calendar manually. I often send myself meeting requests between my work/home so I’ll know what I’m meant to be doing. I’m sure there’s Managers who can have a better experience being mobile… but not us plebs.

Contacts. Never the twain shall meet. Work contacts are duplicated on my personal contacts manually.


Google drive acts as an online repository for documents needed between devices. I’d love to use Microsoft’s cloud but again work seems to not want me to share.The one area of apps that does work for me is Adobe Creative Cloud which work have purchased as a service and I can run on any of my devices anywhere. Being a non-firewalled SAAS cloud controlled offering gives me great flexibility. As Govt. is so Microsoft Office based, a full move to Office in the cloud would be a game changer for me. Currently I’m on a trial at work for Office but it’s restricted to only within the Govt. network.. so only works if vpn connected.
Notes is one area I’ve never been able to settle on for a decade or more. If work didn’t restrict my syncing Onenote I’d be on that but that one aspect means I struggle along with transient notes strewn across everything. I used to love google notebook.. but alas they canned that. I try and focus on using google apps but thats not much use on my phone. The Notes app on my iMac is good now I can have it on my mac and sync it to iCloud to my phone. But that still leaves me to have to login to iCloud if on a PC to leave a note.

So I seem to have Google as the centre of much of what I do but only on account of being restricted by where I work. If work removed that, now that the majority of Microsft apps are available on the Mac, I’d be on Microsoft cloud like a shot for docs and apps, notes, calendars and contacts. It’d be hard to ditch google for email… but even that might become a funnel to Microsoft’s offerings.

The cloud services seem to be great if you’re one person with one identity and can find everything you need from one economy and that economy’s preferred devices.

That’s a lot of “ones” in one sentence. Which makes me think that silos haven’t gone away with the cloud … they’ve merely migrated there.

Sorry to confuse you more JP.

* Photo : Industrial Other by Sydney Architects & Building Designers Alexander Michael & Assoc

Listener’s Poker

Over on his blog, my mate Kent has started a game of listeners poker. He explains it like this:

[It’s like]  Liar’s Poker, but with sound.  Somebody pick something good, and others try to top it.  We’re talking playing, and musicianship.  Not just some studio-created and network-marketed nonsense.  Music.  Reeeeeel music.

Well, I’m game. And seeing as he started with an instrumental I’ll continue that theme, and raise him a Bruce Cockburn

Got some music you think is good?

Prove it!

Firechat Enables the Crowd to Become the Internet –Bypassing Central Powers | Web Strategy by Jeremiah Owyang | Digital Business

Keep an eye on this. Mesh networking should be more of a player as proliferation of mobile devices increases. Especially in high density populations.

Firechat Enables the Crowd to Become the Internet –Bypassing Central Powers | Web Strategy by Jeremiah Owyang | Digital Business.

The unconsciously built connected consciousness | Cluetrain at Fifteen


[The Net is] the connected consciousness of the market itself. It makes markets smart by giving customers unprecedented powers, the most fundamental of which is each other

via Cluetrain at Fifteen | Linux Journal.

What I have always loved about Doc is how human he is.

For me this quote encompasses everything the article has to say…

It also points to what I consider as to the how the Net itself came into being… as an unconsciously built connectivity tool… because as humans we create and form what we crave.